Personal Injury, Employment & Immigration Law

FAQs

Here at Daniel | Williams & Associates PLLC, we know you have questions about your case -- or maybe you just want to know if you have a case at all. With more than a decade of experience, we’ve seen many of these questions before. We would love to help you find quick answers and peace of mind, so we’ve compiled a number of the most frequently asked questions below. If you need any legal assistance, please do not hesitate to call.

Employment Law FAQs

What should I do if I suspect my employer is conducting illegal activity?

The best thing to do is to talk to an experienced employment attorney quickly. You should also document as much about what has happened as possible. Save emails and text messages, talk to witnesses and write out a diary of events. Your employer will likely dispute your account, and the evidence you have can help you prove what happened — and what still may be happening. In some cases, you can also file reports to your HR department, the EEOC, or even OSHA for safety-related issues such as retaliation for refusal to do dangerous work.
What you may discover is that you are not at all alone. If the illegal activity has impacted you and your career, there are likely other employees who have found themselves in the same position. Getting their statements and accounts can help to establish a pattern of behavior. This is important if your employer tries to claim that what happened was a one-time event or a misinterpretation.

Was I wrongfully terminated/fired?

Wrongful termination can happen for many reasons. If you have a contract, it happens whenever the terms of that contract are breached. For instance, it may state that you can only be fired for cause, when your employer fired you for no reason, citing at-will employment laws. Your contract offers you protections beyond those laws.
While at-will employment does technically mean that anyone can be fired (or can quit) at any time, remember that you still cannot be fired for illegal reasons that violate your rights. Refer to the protected classes noted above (race, religion, sex, age, etc.). If your employer fires you due to your race, for instance, that’s still illegal even if you have no contract and you are an at-will employee.
Moreover, when companies have stated policies in place, even if they’re not technically in a contract, they still have to be followed. For example, your company may have a three-strikes policy that guarantees you two warnings before a firing. Therefore, being fired immediately and without warning could still be illegal, even though at-will employment laws allow it.

How do I know if I have been harassed or discriminated against?

There are protected classes in the United States, and harassment and discrimination typically violate your rights under one of these classes.Per the EEOC, they include:

  • Race
  • Religion
  • Color
  • Sex (along with gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy)
  • Age (40+)
  • National origin
  • Genetic information
  • Disability

Harassment can include everything from jokes to insults to physical contact. Discrimination may include things like failure to hire, wrongful termination, passing you over for promotions, and more. We will determine if your case has all of the necessary components. 

The biggest thing that you should know is that your gut is often right. When things feel unfair and unjust, especially if the perpetrator is an employer or a supervisor, they probably are unfair and unjust. When your rights are violated, you need someone to stand up on your behalf. We can do that for you in any industry.

Immigration Law FAQs

What types of visas are available if I want to come to the U.S. for a visit or temporary stay?

You can choose from numerous types of visas for your visit, depending on the terms and goals of that visit, along with your own status. For instance, there are tourist visas for a leisure visit, student visas if you’re coming to the U.S. for school, visas for professional athletes, and visas for medical treatment. There are dozens of short-term visas without even considering typical immigration visas, such as those used to help reunite family members.

We can help you determine what would work best for your purposes and help you file the proper paperwork to apply. Remember that you have to abide by the length and terms of the visa, though you may also be able to change your status — by getting a green card, for instance — once you are in the United States. We can assist with all of these steps and ensure that you know exactly what is expected and required by the U.S. government.

I have received a deportation order. Is there anything I can do to avoid being deported?

Yes. Generally, once you get the order, you have the next 30 days to decide what you want to do. In that time, you can choose to file an appeal. Once you do this, your case is put on hold until the appeal is considered — meaning you won’t be deported, even if the 30 days run out before the appeal process finishes. There are numerous reasons to appeal a deportation order, so do not assume that getting one means you’re out of options. You merely need to know what steps to take to start the appeal, on what grounds you can file it, and how to proceed to give yourself the best chance of having the order rescinded. We can walk you through these steps and offer support during a trying time.

How do I obtain a Green Card? How long will my Green Card remain valid?

You can get a green card for many different reasons, such as getting married to a U.S. citizen or applying for a green card as part of your career. You may also be able to get one as a refugee or an asylum seeker. We can help you determine if you’re eligible and which type of application you should use. If you do get a green card, it will then last for the next 10 years. Many people use green cards as a stepping stone, allowing them to stay in the U.S. while they work on becoming a citizen, but you do not have to do so. You also have options to renew a green card after it has expired or to replace it when necessary.

Personal Injury FAQs

When is the right time to contact a personal injury lawyer?

The first thing to do after being injured is to get proper medical care. The second thing to do is to contact a personal injury lawyer. Do not delay. There are often deadlines that have to be met, evidence that needs to be gathered and documentation that needs to be compiled. The sooner you begin, the sooner you get the compensation you need. You certainly do not want to procrastinate and then find out that your otherwise valid case no longer qualifies because there was a statute of limitations. Let us help today.

How much is my personal injury/accident case worth?

This all depends on the type of case and the extent of your injuries. Some people just need to cover their immediate hospital bills so they’re not in debt. Others have life-changing injuries and will never work again, so they may need millions to cover all of those lost earnings and the need for life-long care. Things like age, types of injuries, extent of said injuries and likelihood of recovery are all going to factor in. Each case is unique, and we can begin discussing yours at your consultation. Rest assured that our experienced team knows how to work hard for you and fight for the compensation you deserve.

How do I know if I have a personal injury case?

Personal injury cases generally hinge on negligence and fault. If someone acted in a negligent manner and was at fault for injuries that you suffered, then you deserve just compensation for those injuries. This compensation can help cover your medical bills, make up for lost wages, reimburse you for pain and suffering, and much more. Types of injury cases that we can handle include dog bites, slip-and-fall cases, medical malpractice, motor vehicle accidents and more.

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While this website provides general information, it does not constitute legal advice. The best way to get guidance on your specific legal issue is to contact a lawyer.

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